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Celiac Disease Is An Inherited Disease

Celiac Disease
Written by David

Celiac Disease is an inherited disease. Celiac disease effects those with a genetic predisposition. When people with celiac disease eat gluten (a protein found in wheat, rye and barley), their body mounts an immune response that attacks the small intestine. These attacks lead to damage on the villi, small fingerlike projections that line the small intestine, that promote nutrient absorption. When the villi get damaged, nutrients cannot be absorbed properly into the body.

The intestinal damage can cause weight loss, bloating and sometimes diarrhea. Eventually, your brain, nervous system, bones, liver and other organs can be deprived of vital nourishment.

In children, malabsorption can affect growth and development. The intestinal irritation can cause stomach pain, especially after eating.

Celiac disease is also known as coeliac disease, celiac sprue, non-tropical sprue, and gluten sensitive enteropathy.

Gluten

Gluten is a protein found in three types of cereal:

  • wheat
  • barley
  • rye

Gluten is found in any food that contains the above cereals, including:

  • pasta
  • cakes
  • breakfast cereals
  • most types of bread
  • certain types of sauces
  • some types of ready meals

In addition, most beers are made from barley.

Causes

Normally, the body’s immune system is designed to protect it from foreign invaders. When people with celiac disease eat foods containing gluten, their immune system forms antibodies to gluten which then attack the intestinal lining. This causes inflammation in the intestines and damages the villi, the hair-like structures on the lining of the small intestine. Nutrients from food are normally absorbed by the villi. If the villi are damaged, the person cannot absorb nutrients properly and ends up malnourished, no matter how much he or she eats.

Symptoms

Symptoms of celiac disease vary among sufferers and include:

  • Digestive problems (abdominal bloating, pain, gas, diarrhea, pale stools, and weight loss)
  • A severe skin rash called dermatitis herpetiformis
  • Iron deficiency anemia (low blood count)
  • Musculoskeletal problems (muscle cramps, joint and bone pain)
  • Growth problems and failure to thrive (in children)
  • Seizures
  • Tingling sensation in the legs (caused by nerve damage and low calcium)
  • Aphthous ulcers (sores in the mouth)
  • Missed menstrual periods

Complications

Celiac disease can develop at any age after people start eating foods or medicines that contain gluten. Left untreated, celiac disease can lead to additional serious health problems. These include the development of autoimmune disorders like multiple sclerosis (MS), dermatitis herpetiformis (an itchy skin rash), anemia, osteoporosis, infertility and miscarriage, neurological conditions like epilepsy and migraines, short stature, and intestinal cancers.
People who have celiac disease may have other autoimmune diseases, including:
  • Thyroid disease
  • Type 1 diabetes
  • Lupus
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Sjögren’s syndrome (a disorder that causes insufficient moisture production by the glands)
Treatment
Currently, the only treatment for celiac disease is lifelong adherence to a strict gluten-free diet. People living gluten-free must avoid foods with wheat, rye and barley, such as bread and beer. Ingesting small amounts of gluten, like crumbs from a cutting board or toaster, can trigger small intestine damage.

About the author

David

www.alternative-pro.com